Owner:Cory Scott
Ride: 1992 Mazda B2200
Hometown: Conroe, TX
Club: Negative Camber

Though Cory Scott's name may not be too familiar with everyone in the minitruck scene, he is well-known for building some of the sickest fullsize trucks around. Since he has been so successful with the larger trucks, he thought he would take a shot at building a clean mini.

Cory Scott is the owner of a leading auto body shop in Conroe, Texas called Kustom Werx. Cory has been conducting business for nearly a decade while building personal rides in his spare time. During this stretch, he has created some jaw-dropping trucks and helped many customers and friends by finishing their customs with topnotch paintjobs. While waiting for his newest creation, an '81 Chevy Blazer, to get a body drop from Ekstensive Metalworks, Cory got the itch again. On top of that, his friend "D.A. Scot" Rupp told him that he did not have what it takes to build a badass minitruck.

After arguing about it and contemplating how he could prove his friend wrong, Cory decided to purchase a truck and make it nice enough to be shot for a magazine. Since he has already done well with his fullsize trucks, having several of them on the cover of many other rags, he made it his goal to get this one on the cover of the only magazine dedicated to the sickest custom minitrucks out there. Another thing that pushed him forward with this project is the fact that minitrucks are cheaper to build and that meant he could afford to finish it before he was able to wrap up his Blazer.

To get things started, Cory scoured the web to catch his next diamond in the rough that would let him accomplish his goal. Though there were many trucks to choose from, this '92 Mazda B2200 caught his eye as it had a newly rebuilt motor and was only going for $2,500.

The only catch was that it was in Miami, Florida, but since Cory or "D.A. Scot" had never been to this beach city and needed a break, they caught a flight to go check out the truck. When they got there, they noticed that not only did it have rust, but every body panel needed work. Because Cory and his shop staff are miracle men at this, he decided not to waste the trip and purchased the Mazda anyways. Rolling on four very sketchy tires, they drove it home with a top speed of 78 mph and made it without any major hiccups. Back at the shop, Cory got to work by tackling the suspension allowing the truck to tuck a set of 20s. Up front, the factory spring perches were torched off and mounting brackets were made to hold a pair of 2,500-pound Firestone airbags. Then, Chassis Tech 2-inch drop spindles were bolted between the control arms. Out back, Cory created a custom triangulated four-link and fitting the 20-inch wheels meant that the stock wheelwells needed to be cut then finished off with a custom set of tubs.

In order to take care of the damaged body, Cory and his employee Charles Kell pulled out all the dents and made patch panels for the rusted areas. While working on the body, Cory had a good idea for the rear of the truck. That was to give it a combo skin and create a smooth recessed bumper. After welding on the Grant Kustoms skin, he used a bumper from a 1997 Ford Explorer to follow his plan. It was widened pie-cut on the ends and platted smooth just before receiving two 8-inch LED taillights. After the body was shaved of the annoying stock items, the truck was pulled into the Kustom Werx paint booth where it received a Scarlet red basecoat. Then Cory opted to have Pat Maxwell lay and spray a wicked set of hot rod flames with striping before it was covered in clear.

With help of friend Ryan Ruffin, Cory finished the truck with some clean interior work. For this, a custom center console, stereo box, and door panels were made while still retaining the clean hot-rod look. Originally the interior was grey so Cory decided to do a complete color change to brown with a few pieces painted to match the exterior base coat. With some upholstery work, the truck was done and it now wows on-lookers nationwide. For being a rookie at building a mini, Cory sure did one hell of a job with his first, and we're sure it won't be his last. For more information on the mods performed, check out the Lowdown.