Not everything that’s new is good. Just look around. The rise of resurrecting vehicles, parts and things from the past has always been in high demand, but when it comes time to tap into the wells of history, style and soul prove to be most valuable. (Note: no, your dad’s corduroy bell bottom pants from his high school glory days aren’t in style, and yes, they have already run completely out of soul. They did a long time ago.)

So what other items and gadgets from the ’70s would be safe to incorporate into a solid / modern (and socially acceptable) fashion statement? Well, bad pants have already been ruled out. What about white dude fros? Nope. One-piece zip-up jumpsuits? No way. How’s an old Chevy 250ci inline six-banger sound? Bingo! Eric Higdon, builder of the fine specimen of an Chevrolet S-10 seen on the pages before you, thought the engine, along with a few other throwback touches, would date his date his truck for the better. Eric says, “Over the years, I fell in love with classic lines of old trucks and the rat rods, but still love to see high-dollar modifications done on minis. I always wondered how I could fit all these ideas from different vehicles into an Chevy S-10 build.” Well, you aren’t the only one wondering, Eric. Please elaborate.

I started to see a difference in quality and I started to wonder what it would take to catch people’s attention.

“Once I put a plan together, I contacted Eye Kandy Designs and came up with a sweet rendering. I just ran with it. The one thing I’m proud of is the old school straight-six motor. It just seemed like a lot of builders go with the same common carbureted 350. I get so many compliments on it, but after all the work and headaches we went through to get it running properly, I wish I’d gone with a V-8.” Yeah, the inline six was definitely a turn in the right direction, and so was the ’59 Impala dash, but flawless execution is what fused the streams of inspiration into what has become quite the quality creation.

Now, back to talking about time periods. A truck like this doesn’t just pop out from someone’s garage in a year or so. Eric’s been building his Chevy since 1999 -- 15 years ago. “I got this Chevy S-10 just after my 1996 GMC Sonoma was hit from behind and totaled out. This one started out at four different shops, I then took a break when I joined the Army to fight in a war -- it took a lot of time and cash to get it to this point.” Money and might aside, it was still another S-10 build or at least, that was the mentality Eric was trying to break away from. “Looking back at the years or going to different shows, watching DVDs, and talking to people about their trucks, I started to see a difference in quality and I started to wonder what it would take to catch people’s attention. I just had to kick things up a notch.”

Special Thanks From Owner

“To all the friends and girlfriends who have come and gone, to MT Mag for all the inspiration over the last 16 years I’ve been a reading, Lee Allums for the parts and supplies in the last year and my good friend Nic Barbee who helped make my vision come true.”


The Lowdown
Vehicle: 1998 Chevrolet S-10
Owner/Hometown: Eric Higdon / Cullman, AL
Rolling Attire
Wheels: 18x8 Boss 338 (front) / 20x8½ (rear)
Tires: 235/40ZR18 Nexen (front) / 255/35ZR20 (rear)
Chassis Modifications
Suspension (front): Slam Specialties RE6
Suspension (rear): Slam specialties RE6 over factory axle, dimple-die bridge, two-link w/ rear reverse dimple-die wishbone
Control Arms: Choppin’ Block uppers, RideTech lowers
Compressor(s): Dual Viair 444s
Air/Hydro Accessories: Accuair VU4 valve unit
Frame Mods: 2x3 mandrel-bent frame rails from firewall back
Brakes: Stock
Performed By: Nic Barbee at Real Steel Garage
Body Modifications
Shaved: Door handles, third brake light, cowl hood
Bodydrop: Traditional
Body Mods: Stretched factory bumper 3-inches, 1960s Impala wiper cowl, bed sheetmetal work done with no floor or back wall, fleetside tailgate, roll pan combo cut for the step side, flush fat eye tail lights, handmade metal steps
Performed By: Nic Barbee at Real Steel Garage
Paint
Brand & Colors: Matrix 2011 Volkswagen Toffee Brown and 2011 Chevy Victory Red
Performed By: Nic Barbee at Real Steel Garage
Interior
Seats: Handmade to wrap around fuel tank
Dash: 1959 Impala sections with factory trim and accessories
Gauges: Dakota Digital gauges in ashtray
Performed By: Owner
Engine/Performance
Engine: Early 1970s Chevy 250ci inline-six banger
Transmission: 350 turbo
Detail Work: Painted Victory Red
Performed By: Nic Barbee at Real Steel Garage