So Mike and I got into this conversation the other day. When is too much too much? When is too far too far, and lord help me, when is too low too low? There probably isn't a correct answer for these questions, but I'll give my two cents on the situation.

We have all seen those trucks that are cut to the door handle, laying headlight flat on the pavement and having to replace their tailgate handle because they keep draggin' through it. Some mini-truckers would say that this is the ultimate extreme and love it. Some mini-truckers would say that it's ridiculous, undriveable, and unproportioned. So where do I fall in this mix? I guess I would have to be somewhere in between. Here is a list of my likes, dislikes, and personal opinions on such debated issues. Also added are some styling cues that have always been on my mind.

1. Proportion is key. Certain trucks, if they are cut to the doors or lowered, usually it will take a small chop to make them look correct again.

2. I personally like a vehicle that is capable of being driven without looking ridiculous doing it. This means, if you put gel in your hair and it could dry and get stuck in your headliner, that's not for me.

3. Huge chop, no drop. This works the same in reverse, to me, with a huge chop and a ride that's not that low. Personally, it doesn't look right to me.

4. We all know the truck that has to shave off everything in the world and owns stock in Gillette. Personally, to make a truck look right sometimes certain things have to be left. A lot of mini's with shaved body lines just don't look right to me. Old cars have amazing lines and can have a completely smooth body because of their natural lines. New rides are pretty boring in comparison panelwise and need that body line to break it up.

5. My take on trailer queens. I have owned both a finished daily-driven, slammed truck and owned a trailer queen. In order to push the envelope on both ends of the spectrum you need both mini's to flourish in the scene. Ultimate respect to the driver that is clean as hell but in actuality, the only near-perfect mini's you'll ever see are the trailer queens. Put the trash talk away and respect both rides, as the owners both have blood, sweat, and tears into them and they are both mini-truckers.

Those people that push the envelope to be the first or the lowest I do respect, though. Even though sometimes I think it looks ridiculous, I know that what they do drives other mini-truckers to step up the bar. We do need these people to continue setting trends even though some of the attempts die horrific deaths.

Me, personally - I don't care if a truck is driven daily, fully shaved, the lowest, the biggest wheels, or the brightest. You know what I like? A sick-ass truck that is built well and looks good. I don't know how much more simply I could put it. Some of my favorite trucks are the simplest trucks out there with the mildest mods. I totally respect that guy going for the gold, trying to be the best of everything, but there is some skepticism to this, as how many of those trucks do you ever see finished? It seems as if a lot of these people are manic-depressives that crash and burn and are out of the scene as quickly as they cut up their S-10 on 28s that's chopped 10 inches, cut to the roof, has a tubbed tonneau cover, and is going to put House of Kolors' paint chart to shame with how many colors they add.

I came to realize something about a year or two ago that made me start to think a little differently. I know I have a very addictive personality, which is why my Nissan ended up the way it did. I wanted to clown everyone, win "Best of" in every single category, and I was well on my way. What I learned is that it doesn't matter if you have the craziest truck ever built if it's never completed. I would rather have a sick mini that I can bring out as finished than have the dopest one that will never see the light of day or roll under its own power. A lot of people will disagree with me on certain aspects of this column but, hey, opinions are like billet grilles: Everyone has one.