There is something about the Colorado River that makes it a magnet for all things that are cool. Because of its mystique and reputation for being the party capital of the West Coast, big-block-powered boats, personal watercraft, girls, and mini-trucks are all magically drawn to this shimmering body of water every summer for our favorite truck runs. What ensues after the arrival of these spectacular machines and the men and women who come for the party can't adequately be described with mere words. To comprehend it all, you'll have to go yourself. We'll just have to try and do our best to dust off the memories and give it a shot anyway.

Last October, the Southern Nevada Mini-Truck Council got together and held a run that provided the West Coast mini-truck community with one last dose of sun and fun for the year. Our adventure began Friday morning while we prepared for the trip by gathering our friends, trucks, and water toys. This included literally breaking our drag boat out of hibernation from behind the fence of a friend's house because we didn't have the key for the lock on the gate. After we rescued the moisture missile from its secret hiding place, we put the fence back together and were on our way to Laughlin, Nevada, with 10 happy mini-truckers in tow.

When we arrived at the campground late Friday night, the party was well underway, so we were anxious to get settle. Before we could do that, though, we had to make an obligatory lap around the campground to let everyone know that MT was in the house. The party people were in good spirits that night, and everyone was anticipating an exciting show on Saturday.

Morning came, and after everyone nursed their own version of the world's worst hangover, they rolled their minis over to the grass-covered show area. The show lasted the whole day, but after having their rides judged, many enthusiasts headed back to the campground to go play in the river and escape the hot weather. Those who hung out for the show were treated to a plethora of custom minis, fullsize trucks, skied prerunners, 4x4s, and custom compacts. We spotted several past feature vehicles that looked like they were in the midst of some heavy reconstruction roaming the campground, proving once again that mini-trucks are never truly finished. Cruising was a high priority among those in attendance; the strip around the campground was jammed up bumper to bumper with minis of all kinds. Most everything was 'bagged or juiced and laying some type of metal on the ground, be it rocker or frame. Some of the tallest trucks around rumbled through the campsites full of happy mini-truckers who lounged in makeshift hot tubs made out of tarps and truck beds.

Saturday night, the party got started early, and by 9 p.m., everyone in the whole camp was dancing their butts off to the bangin' sounds that the DJ provided. The SNMTC staff did an excellent job of keeping things safe while allowing everyone to enjoy the festivities that can only take place at a river run.

For us, Sunday morning was spent cleaning up our campsite and loading up trailers and watercraft. Trophies were handed out nice and early so that everyone could get home before the weather got ugly. No matter how we look at it, this show was great and it should be even better for 2001. If you would like to attend this year's event, visit the Southern Nevada Mini-Truck Council's Web site at www.snmtcc.com. See ya there.